Volvariella volvacea Bulliard Fi ies Singer

Mushroom Growing 4 You

Growing Mushrooms at Home

Get Instant Access

Link Trainer Instrument Panel
Figure 302. V. volvacea mycelia at 4 and 2 days after inoculation onto malt extract agai.

introduction: Once you have tasted fresh Paddy Straw mushrooms, it :s easy to understand the high esteem this mushroom has attained in Asia. I find fresh V. volvacea to be one of the best of all edible

* Canned Paddy Straw mushrooms lack the richness of the fresh fruitbodies mushrooms The duration from inoculation to fruiting is awesomely fast, giving comp stitors little opportunity to flourish. The Paddy Straw Mushroom is an ideal species for the low-tech cultiv ion by rural people in subtropical and tropical climates After the rice harvest, farmers mulch their nee straw into mounds, and inoculate them with commercial spawn. This companion method of farming has given economic stability to many rural populations, providing a much needed supplementary income to rice farmers during the off-season.

Common Names: Paddy Straw Mushroom Straw Mushroom Chinese Mushroom Fukurotake (Japanese)

Taxonomic Synonyms & Considerations: V volvacea and V bakeri (Murr.) Shaffer are synonymous, according to Vela and Martinez-Carrera (1989).

Description: As the name implies, this mushroom's most distinctive feature is its volva, or cup, and resembles a classic Amanita except that an annulus is lacking and its spores are salmon-pink The cap is 5-15 cm broad egg-shaped at first, soon expanding to campanulate or broadly convex with a slight umbo smoky brown to cigar-brown to blackish brown, darker when young, fading in age and/or with exposure to light. Margin edge radially ridged. Gills free, white at first, soon pinkish, close to crov d. Stem 4-20 cm. long x 1.0-1.5 cm. thick, white to yellowish, solid, and smooth. The stem base is encased in a thick volva.

Distribution: Thriving throughout tropical and subtropical Asia this mushroom grows singly or in groups Also found in eastern North America in hot houses, composts, or soils, especially in the southeastern states Discarded experiments from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada are suspected in creating a recurring patch of the Paddy Straw mushroom which persisted for nearly a decade. (Kroeger (1993)).

Natura' Habitat: On composting rice straw, sugar cane residue, leaf piles, and compost heaps during periods of warm weather from the spring through autumn. Several reports of this species growing in northern temperate climates have been traced to "escapees" from mushroom cultivators.

Microscopic Features: Spores pink to salmon brown, (6) 7.5-9 x 4-6 Cheilocystidia, pleurocystidia and chlamydospores are present.

Available Strains: Widely available, both from wild and developed stocks. Strains of V volvacea die under cold storage. Many cultivators have found that cultures store best at ambient room temperature (i.e. above 45 0 F. (1.2° C.)). Cold weather strains have yet to be developed. For more information, consult Jinxia & Chang (1992) and Chang (1972).

Mycelial Characteristics Longitudinally linear soon aerial and disorganized, greyish white at first soon, dingy yellowish brown, eventually becoming light gray brown to reddish brown, often with complex discolored zones.

Fragrance Signature: Mycelium musty, not pleasant to this author.

Natural Method of Cultivation: On rice straw using a simple composting technique. Straw and cot

Figure 303. Soaked straw is thrown into a tapering, trapezoid-shaped form.

Figure 304. Soaked cottonseed hulls are thrown around the outer inside edge of the frame and then inoculated with grain spawn. Additional layers are built in the same fashion.

Figure 303. Soaked straw is thrown into a tapering, trapezoid-shaped form.

tonseed hulls are separately submerged in water. Saturated straw is laid directly on the ground in approx' nately a 2 ft. x 2 ft. square; to a 2-3 inch depth. See Figures 303 through 305.

Recommended Courses for Expansion of Mycelial Mass to Achieve Fruiting: Traditional or liquid fermentation methods work well for spawn generation Indoors, commercial cultivators use a single stage composting schedule that contrasts with the methods Button mushroom growers use.

Rice straw is chopped into 4-5 in. (10-12 cm.) pieces, soaked and stacked outside to tenderize the straw for no more than two days. A moisture content of 75% is desired. Cottonseed hulls are soaked for 2-7 days, allowed to ferment, and then layered onto the straw at the rate equivalent to 10-20% of the rice straw. For outdoor cultivation, spawn is added directly to the cottonseed hulls as each layer is built. The mass is covered with the goal of obtaining at least 90° F. (32° C.) for the next 5-7 days

Figure 304. Soaked cottonseed hulls are thrown around the outer inside edge of the frame and then inoculated with grain spawn. Additional layers are built in the same fashion.

Figure 305. After 4-6 layers, the frame is lifted off, and the process begins anew.

layer of straw which is kept moist.

Figure 308. In as short as 7 days, m^.irooms torm. A hoop frame covered with plastic helps maintain ■nidity and warmth at night during the primor-dia formation period.

Figures 309. The outdoor harvest can be substantial.

,,„JC (.„n hp created and covered witn piasnc or a neavj Figures 306-407. Multiple square or rectangular muunds car be created ana layer of straw which is kept moist.

Figure 308. In as short as 7 days, m^.irooms torm. A hoop frame covered with plastic helps maintain ■nidity and warmth at night during the primor-dia formation period.

Figures 309. The outdoor harvest can be substantial.

i. us: oom formation, ■ hich usually occurs 4-6 days days later. SuggestedAgar Culture Media: MYA,OMYA and PDYA

1st 2 1& _ ¿enerationSpawnMedia:Pice,rye,wheat,sorghurr quart be a. ¡pawn s usually provided in convement-to-use 5-10 ,ter plastic bags.

ubstrat for Fruiting: Straw preferably rice hardwood sawdusts. Wheat straw also supports

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Organic Gardeners Composting

Organic Gardeners Composting

Have you always wanted to grow your own vegetables but didn't know what to do? Here are the best tips on how to become a true and envied organic gardner.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment