About Spraying

Use only contact sprays approved lor edible fruits and vegetables.

Warning; Do not use TOXIC SYSTEMIC CHEMICALS! Read the entire label on all sprays. The toxic or active life of the spray is listed on the label. Wait twice as long as the label recommends, and thoroughly wash any foliage before ingesting it. Toxic life is many times longer indoors, because sunlight and other natural forces are not able to break down chemicals.

Sprays are beneficial if not overdone. Every time a plant is sprayed, the stomata are clogged and growth slows. At 24-28 hours after spraying, rinse leaves on both sides with plain water until it drips from leaves. Avoid sprays that leave a residual during the weeks before harvest. Spraying increases chances ol gray (bud) mold once dense buds form.

Phytotoxicity is the injury to plants caused by sprays. Symptoms include burned leaves, slow growth, or sudden wilt. Spray a lest plant and wait a few days to see if spray is phytotoxic. Water plants before spraying. Phytotoxicity is diminished when more liquid is in foliage.

Temperatures above G8°F (20°C) make virtually all sprays, even organic ones, phytotoxic and damaging to foliage.

Intense light causes leaves to take in the chemicals too quickly and will often cause leaf damage.

Spray early in the day so ingredients are absorbed and foliage dries. Spraying two hours or less before lights-out can cause foliar fungus when water sits on leaves too long.

Do not mix two products. It could change the characteristics of both.

Warm temperatures mean spraying twice as often, because the bugs breed twice as fast.

Use a clean, accurate measuring cup or spoon. Measure quantities carefully!

Curled haves are (he result of mixing and applying sprays that are too strong. The natural spray applied to this plant was mixed double-strength.

A pump-up sprayer with a spray wand allows you to deliver spray under leaves where most pests live.

Too strong a spray caused brown bum spots and made this leaf curl downward.

Powder fungicides arc easiest to apply with an applicator that disperses the powder evenly on foliage.

This grower is taking no chances. He suited up to avoid any contort with sprays.

Hold foliage back so you can spray under the leaves where most peats reside.

Mix pesticides and fungicides just before using them, and safely dispose of unused spray. Mix fertilizer and use lor several weeks.

Mix wettable powders and soluble crystals in a little bol water to make sure they dissolve before adding the balance of the tepid water.

Use chemical sprays with extreme care, if at all, in enclosed areas; they are more concentrated indoors than outdoors in the open air.

Use a facemask when spraying, especially if using an aerosol fogger.

Spray entire plants, both sides of the leaves, stems, soil, and pot. Be careful with new, tender-growing shoots; they are easily burned by harsh sprays,

A one quart (0.9-1.8 L) or two quart pump-up spray bottle with a removable nozzle that is easy to clean is ideal. Keep a paper clip handy to ream out clogged debris in nozzle.

A 1-2 gallon (3.8-7.6 L) sprayer costs less than S50 and works well for large gardens. An application wand and nozzle attached to a flexible hose makes spraying under leaves where insects live easy. Plastic is recommended; it does not corrode or rust.

Electric foggcrs work well for large jobs, The spray is metered out a nozzle under high pressure, which creates a fine penetrating fog.

Wash the sprayer and the nozzle thoroughly after each use. Using the same bottle for fertilizers and insecticides is okay. Do not mix insecticides and fungicides together or with anything else. Mixing chemicals could cause a reaction that lessens their effectiveness.

Raise HID lamp out of the way so mist from spray will not touch the bulb; temperature stress, resulting from the relatively cold water hitting the hot bulb, may cause it to shatter. This could not only scare the hell out of you, it could burn eyes and skin. If the bulb breaks, turn off the system immediately and unplug!

This grower is taking no chances. He suited up to avoid any contort with sprays.

Hold foliage back so you can spray under the leaves where most peats reside.

Too strong a spray caused brown bum spots and made this leaf curl downward.

Powder fungicides arc easiest to apply with an applicator that disperses the powder evenly on foliage.

MARIJUANA HORTICULTURE The Indoor/Outdoor MEDICAL GROWER S BIBLE

MANAGEMENT AND BIOLOGICAL CONTROL

J.AA. AAcPartland, R.C. Cfarke and D.P. Watson

Hemp Diseases and Pests is ¿1 detailed trouble-shooting guide focusing on diseases and pests of cannabis that arise in greenhouse, growroom, and outdoor crops. Pests and diseases can be identified by written descriptions, plant symptom keys, detailed line drawings, and photographs. Organic methods are emphasized, with explicit instructions for biodynamic techniques and biological pest control,

Stats: oversized hardcover (British Al-paper), 251 pp.

Profusely illustrated: 111 black & white photos and drawings, 06 color photos, 36 tables and charts.

More info and ordering: Jorge's site: www.marijuanagrowing.com

Oxford University Press: www.oup-usa.com; in Europe: www.cabi-piiblishing.org/fiookshrjp

Copies also available at Ebay and Amazon.com

MARIJUANA HORTICULTURE The Indoor/Outdoor MEDICAL GROWER'S E

Capture resin glands with small heads with a smaller mesh sieve. Courtesy of the Greenhouse.

stalk and just under the round head.

Growing Soilless

Growing Soilless

This is an easy-to-follow, step-by-step guide to growing organic, healthy vegetable, herbs and house plants without soil. Clearly illustrated with black and white line drawings, the book covers every aspect of home hydroponic gardening.

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