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The United States, cut off from 80% of its Russian hemp supply, debates war in Congress.3

Ironically, it is representatives of the western states who argue for war under the excuse of "impressed" American sailors. However, the representatives of the maritime states, fearful of loss of trade, argue against war, even though it's their shipping, crews, and states that are allegedly afflicted.

Not one senator from a maritime state votes for war with Great Britain, whereas virtually all western senators vote for war, hoping to take Canada from Britain and fulfill their dream of "Manifest Destiny," in the mistaken belief that Great Britain is too busy with the European wars against Napoleon to protect Canada.

It's interesting to note that Kentucky, a big supporter of the war which disrupted the overseas hemp trade, was actively building up its own domestic hemp industry.

At this time, 1812, American ships could pick up hemp from Russia and return with it three times faster than shippers could get hemp from Kentucky to the East coast over land (at least, until the Erie Canal was completed in 1825; shortening travel time dramatically by as much as 90%).

The western states win in Congress, and on June 18, 1812, the United States is at war with Britain.

America enters the war on the side of Napoleon, who marches on Moscow in June of 1812.

Napoleon is soon defeated in Russia by the harsh winter, the Russian scorched-earth policy, 2,000 miles of snowy and muddy supply lines and by Napoleon not stopping for the winter and regrouping before marching on Moscow, as was the original battle plan.

Of the 450,000 to 600,000 men Napoleon start with, only 180,000 ever make it back.

1812 TO 1814

Britain, after initial success in war with the United States (including the burning of Washington in retaliation for the earlier American burning of Toronto, then the colonial Canadian capitol), finds its finances and military stretched thin with blockades, war in Spain with France, and a tough new America on the seas.

Britain agrees to peace, and signs a treaty with the United States in December, 1814. The actual terms of the treaty give little to either side.

In effect, Britain agrees it will never again interfere with American shipping.

And the United States agrees to give up all claims to Canada forever (which we did, with the exception of "54-40 or Fight").

1813 TO 1814

Britain defeats Napoleon in Spain and banishes him to Elba, but he escapes for 100 days.

1815

Britain defeats Napoleon at Waterloo (June 18) and banishes him to St. Helena Island off Antarctica where, in 1821, he dies and his hairs and private parts are sold to the public for souvenirs.

JANUARY 1815

Tragically for Britain, more than two weeks after the December 24, 1814, signing of the Ghent peace treaty between the United States and Britain, Andrew Jackson defeats a huge British attack force at New Orleans (January 8, 1815) while news of the treaty slowly makes its way across the Atlantic.

20TH CENTURY

American, British, French, Canadian, and Russian schools each teach children their own, completely different versions of history with virtually no mention of hemp in this war (nor, in the American versions, at any other time in history).

Footnotes:

1. Russia under the Czars' and Russian Orthodox Church's domination continued to have virtual slave/serf/peasant labor for making hemp until 1917.

2. One of America's leading foreign trade deficits, until this century, was to Russia for hemp.

3. Crosby, Alfred, Jr., America, Russia, Hemp & Napoleon, Ohio State University Press, 1965. This situation only began to improve after the 1898 (Spanish-American War) conquest and acquisition of the Philippines with its (cheap) "coolie" labor and manila-hemp (abaca).

4. Adams, John Q., microfilms, Mass. Historical Society, Boston, MA.

AUTHOR'S NOTE:

I wish to apologize to history buffs for all the nuances I have left out from the outline of the 1812 Wars (for example, the involvement of the Rothschilds, the Illuminati, stock market manipulations, etc., but I did not want to write "War and Peace". It's been done. My intention is that our children are taught a true, comprehensive history in our schools, not watered-down nonsense that hides the real facts and makes the War of 1812 totally unintelligible and seemingly without rhyme or reason when taught in school by teachers who don't have the foggiest reason why it was fought. But it's no wonder. Our American school teachers themselves often haven't the foggiest understanding of why this war was really fought. If they do know or have recently learned they are generally much too intimidated to teach it.

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