Medical Marijuana A Brief History

To its ongoing shame, the United States government still denies that medical marijuana has any benefit whatsoever.

But the truth is getting out there. Not since prohibition began in 1937 has there been such a large body of knowledge. Millions now know that medical marijuana provides safe, effective relief for a wide array of ailments, from chronic pain and migraines to glaucoma, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis and the debilitating effects of chemotherapy and AIDS.

And I think that s what Nature grows them herbs for They was put on earth for man to use. The animals have an instinct for 'em. That s why cats go for catnip. The women used to take that hamp [hemp] and steam the leaves and make kind of a plaster out of it. It was supposed to be good for takin' out inflammations, and it was, too.

Oral History

From the Library of Congress, Circa 1930

Marijuana is not physically addicting, nor does it kill like alcohol and cigarettes. While more than 100,000 people a year die from legal prescription drugs, not a single person in recorded history has ever died from medical marijuana.

When the safety record of marijuana is compared to other legal substances, medical marijuana prohibition makes no sense at all.

Annual drug and alcohol deaths in the United States:

Tobacco 450,000

Alcohol 100,000

Prescriptions 100,000

Aspirin 1,000

Marijuana 0

Yet the politicians refuse to budge and the Drug Czar, retired General Barry McCaffrey, thinks he knows better than your doctor what's good for you.

Among the many myths McCaffrey and his cronies spread is that medical marijuana is an unproven drug that hasn't undergone rigorous scientific scrutiny. To the contrary, the federal government has spent yifrJ*-**^u/c»«.

"Certainly no good reason can be assigned why the Hemp of New Zealand should not thrive with us, as that country lyes [sic] in about the same Southern latitude that our middle States do in the Northern. The Hemp of the East Indies grows well here (from my own experience) and I have no doubt of the Tea plant succeeding in So. Carolina and Georgia."

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