Embelia ribes Burm f

[From Singhalese, aembilla = Embelia ribes and from Arabic, ribas = sorrel]

Common names: Common embelia; akarsulur kerang (Malay); amogha (Sanskrit).

Uses: The seeds of Embelia ribes Burm. f. are eaten to expel intestinal worms in several Asian countries. In Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam, the seeds are used to expel intestinal worms. The dried leaves are used to heal pimples and boils. In India, the seeds are used to relieve the bowels of costiveness and to expel intestinal worms. Embelia (British pharmaceutical Codex, 1934), or the dried fruits which must contain about 2.5% of embelin, was used to expel intestinal worms (dose: 4g-16g; 60-240 grains) in Western medicine.

Images Embelin Seeds

Fig. 139. Embelia ribes Burm.f. From: KLU Herbarium 35271. Flora of Malaya. Geographical localization: Rimbah Ilmu, University of Malaya. Woody climber. Field collector: Mustapha. Botanical Identification: BC Stone. 13 Apr 1978.

Physical description: It is a slender woody climber which grows in the geographical zone spanning India to South China. Leaves: simple, alternate and without stipules. The petiole is short. The blade is narrowly oval, 5 cm-10 cm x 1.5 cm-5 cm, and shows a few pairs of indistinct secondary nerves. The base of the blade is tapered and the apex pointed. The inflorescences are terminal racemes. The flowers are white or greenish, without a corolla tube. The fruits are black, succulent, tipped and 4 mm long berries (Fig. 139).

Fig. 139. Embelia ribes Burm.f. From: KLU Herbarium 35271. Flora of Malaya. Geographical localization: Rimbah Ilmu, University of Malaya. Woody climber. Field collector: Mustapha. Botanical Identification: BC Stone. 13 Apr 1978.

Embelin

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