Bridelia stipularis L Bl

[After SE Bridel, 1761-1828, a botanist; and from Latin, stipula = straw]

Physical description: It is a scrambling shrub or tree which grows up to 8 m high in primary and secondary forests, often near rivers, swamps, seashore, mangrove in Sri Lanka, India, Nepal, Thailand, Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Java, Sunda Islands, Borneo, and Philippines. The stems are obscurely lenticelled, zigzag-shaped and velvety at the apex. Leaves: alternate, simple and stipulate. The stipules are lanceolate-ovate,

Synonymy: Clutia stipularis L., Bridelia scandens (Roxb.) Willd., Bridelia dasycalyx Kurz.

Bridelia Stipularis

Fig. 199. Bridelia stipularis (L.) Bl. From: KLU Herbarium 040386. Smithsonian Institution, The United States National Herbarium, Philippines Islands. Field collector and botanical identification: EH Walber, 21 Dec 1957. Geographical localization: Bataan Peninsula: Dinalupihan, Olongapo road, Km. 126.

3 mm-10 mm x 2 mm-4 mm, whitish to reddish brown pilose, and caducous. The petiole is 3mm-9mm long, and velvety. The blade is obovate-obovate, 5.6cmx2.6cm-6.2cmx2.9cm, char-taceous, and velvety beneath. The base is obtuse-rounded. The margin is crenate. The apex is rounded-acute. The midrib is sunken above and raised below. The blade shows 915 pairs of secondary nerves joining into a marginal vein, and the tertiary veins are scalariform. The inflorescences are glomerules often along leafless branches and spike-like or along branches with small leaves, and 1-6 flowers. The male flowers are cream to greenish or yellowish, and 6 mm-10 mm diameter. The female flowers are reddish green, and up to 12 mm in diameter. The sepals are triangular, 4mm-5mm x 2mm-3mm, and hairy. The petals are variable in shape, 1.5mm-3mm x 1 mm-2.5mm, and cuneate to spathulate at the base and acute at the apex. The andrecium comprises of a 2 mm x 0.5 mm staminal column developing free filaments which are 1.5 mm long terminated with ellipsoid and purple anthers. The ovary is ovoid to globose, and 1.5 mm-2 mm in diameter. There is a pair of styles, joined basally together with stigmas of 1.5mm-3mm long, which are bifid. The fruits are capsular, leathery, 7 mm x 5 mm-9 mm x 6 mm, glossy, smooth, glabrous, 2-locular, and dull dark reddish to black with vestigial sepals at base. The seeds are very small and reddish-brown (Fig. 199).

Fig. 199. Bridelia stipularis (L.) Bl. From: KLU Herbarium 040386. Smithsonian Institution, The United States National Herbarium, Philippines Islands. Field collector and botanical identification: EH Walber, 21 Dec 1957. Geographical localization: Bataan Peninsula: Dinalupihan, Olongapo road, Km. 126.

Uses: In Malaysia, The leaves of Bridelia stipularis (L.) Bl. are used to heal venereal ulcers. In the Philippines, a decoction of the roots is drunk to invigorate the body.

Pharmaceutical potential: The pharmacological potential of Bridelia stipularis (L.) Bl. is yet to be shown.

Antimicrobial properties: Note that it would be interesting to know whether the plant holds any antimicrobial properties as aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Bridelia ferruginea inhibit the proliferation of hospital strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and Staphylococcus epidermidis (Irobi ON et a/., 1994). The antimicrobial property, if any, of Bridelia stipularis (L.) Bl. could be mediated by some tannins or other phenolic substances, since the benzopyran luteoforol

(3', 4,4', 5, 7-pentahydroxyflavan) characterized from the stem bark of Bridelia crenulata inhibits, dose-dependently, the growth of several strains of bacteria in vitro (Ramesh M etal., 2001).

OH OH Luteoforol

Continue reading here: Cleidion spiciflorum Burm f Merr

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