Lorazepam methylsulfonate Lorazepam mesilate

Lorazepam pivalate C15H10Cl2N2O2 C5H10O2. Synthetic substance under international control according to the UN Convention on Psychotropic Substances 1971, Schedule IV. Molecular weight: 423.3. Percentage of anhydrous base: 75.9. See: Benzodiazepines. Lorazepam trimethylacetate Lorazepam pivalate.

Lorazepam, -um Lorazepam. LorazepamI Lorazepam. Lorazepammedical 1 Lorazepam. Lorazepammedical 5 Lorazepam. Lorazepan Lorazepam. Lorazepan Chobet Lorazepam. Lorazepan-Omni Lorazepam. Lord Thai colloquial term for heroin no. 4 for 10 bath.

Lordlar Turkish colloquial term for morphine.

Lords 1. Turkish colloquial term for morphine. 2. Colloquial term for hydromorphone (Dilaudid).

Loremid Pethidine hydrochloride. Lorenin Lorazepam. Lorenz Schonschlank Cathine. Lorepam Lorazepam. Loretensil Lorazepam. Lorfalgyl Pethidine hydrochloride. Loridem Lorazepam. Loril Lorazepam.

Lorillard Company Oldest tobacco manufacturer in the United States, dating to 1760, when a French immigrant, Pierre Lorillard, opened a "manufactory" in New York City. It originally made pipe tobacco, cigars, plug chewing tobacco, and snuff. Tobacco for "roll-your-own" cigarettes was introduced in 1860, and cigarettes were being manufactured by the 1880s. From the 1890s to 1911 it was a part of the giant tobacco trust, the American Tobacco Company (see American Brands, Inc.), but once more became independent when the U.S. Court of Appeals dissolved the trust. Lorillard's chief cigarettes have been Old Gold (introduced in 1926) and Kent (1952). The company, now called Lorillard, is a division of the conglomerate Loews Corporation and is headquartered in New York City. Lorimer method Ultra Rapid Opiate Detoxification. Lorinon Diazepam. Lorivan Lorazepam.

Lormetazepam C16H12Cl2N2O2. Synthetic substance under international control according to the UN Convention on Psychotropic Substances 1971, Schedule IV. Molecular weight: 335.2. Percentage of anhydrous base: 100. See: Benzodiazepines. Lormetazepam, -um Lormetazepam. Lorphan Pharmaceutical narcotic antagonist, no longer produced, used to block the effects of opiates - few side effects: abolishes euphoria, respiratory depression, nausea and gastrointestinal disturbances - instantly puts person into withdrawal (abstinence syndrome occurs if physical dependence has been established). Lorpom Butalbital. Lorsedal Lorazepam. Lorsilan Lorazepam.

Los de la onda Colloquial term for a marijuana user.

Loss of control See Control, loss of. Lossen, William German chemist that after the death of his college Albert Niemann 1861 continued the research on cocaine. Lost Weekend, the Film released in 1945. Director: Billy Wilder. Ray Milland as Don Birnam, a troubled novelist with a drinking problem. Escaping fromthe apartment his worried brother (Phillip Terry) has confined him to for the weekend, Don makes his way to his favorite tavern, where he knocks back drink after drink, transforming from a trembling wreck into a garrulous charmer into a brutish lout. For the remainder of the weekend, he sinks further and further into his drunkenness, resorting even to stealing money from a prostitute to keep himself plied with liquor. Lote Colloquial term for cache of drugs. Lotiven Drug containing more than one substance whereof one under international control: Meprobamate. Lotoquis Phenobarbital. Lotoquis S Phenobarbital. Lotus-eater

1. Greek Mythology. One of a people described in the Odyssey who fed on the lotus and hence lived in a drugged, indolent state.

2. A lazy person devoted to pleasure and luxury.

Lotusate Butalbital. Loubarb Secbutabarbital sodium.

Louse Colloquial term for a stool pigeon. Loused Colloquial term for covered by sores and abscesses from repeated use of unsterile needles.

Love Colloquial term for crack. Love affair Colloquial term for cocaine. Love boat Colloquial term for marijuana dipped in PCP.

Love doctor Colloquial term for MDMA. Love drug 1. Colloquial term for ecstasy. 2. Colloquial term for MDA. 3. Colloquial term for depressant. 4. Colloquial term for methaqualone (benzodiazepine/antihistamine are commonly substituted). Love in Colloquial term for hippie get together, expression of "love" and "altruism" without moral constraint in complete liberty. Love nuggets Colloquial term for marijuana.

Love pearls Colloquial term for alpha-ethyltyptamine.

Love pill Colloquial term for MDA. Love pills 1. Colloquial term for alpha-ethyltyptamine. 2. Colloquial term for MDA. 3-methoxy-4,5-methylenedioxyamfetamine. Love potion #9 Colloquial term for MDMA.

Love trip 1. Colloquial term for ecstasy. 2. Colloquial term for mescaline. 3. Colloquial term for mescaline and MDA. Love weed Colloquial term for marijuana. Loveboat 1. Colloquial term for PCP. 2. A drinking game which required that participants watch the TV show "Loveboat" -they chose 5 words and whenever the actors said one of those words, everyone took a drink.

Lovelies Colloquial term for marijuana laced with PCP.

Lovely Colloquial term for PCP.

Lover Colloquial term for a marijuana smoker.

Low 1. Colloquial term for being depressed. 2. Colloquial term for adulterated, a compound has been added to a drug to dilute its concentration (to increase the total volume and thus the money made).

Low alcohol beer Beer with 2% to 3% alcohol content by volume. Low dose dependence Dependence syndrome when using low doses of benzodiazepi-nes.

Low grade Colloquial term for poor quality drugs.

Low-price girl Colloquial term for inexpensive prostitute - typical circumstance for drug using women who use this fashion to support their drug purchase.

Löwe Colloquial term for injecting drugs. Lowedex Dexamfetamine sulfate.

Lozies Colloquial term for marijuana. LP Colloquial term for listening post, a wire tap location for police.

LSD C20H25N3O. Derivate of lysergic acid, under international control according to the UN Convention on Psychotropic Substances 1971, Schedule I. Molecular weight: 323. 4. Percentage of anhydrous base: 100. In international treaties named lysergide but usually known as LSD short for Lysergic acid di-ethylamide.

A crystalline compound, derived from lysergic acid and used as a powerful hallucenogenic drug. It can be derived from the ergot alkaloids (as ergotamine and ergonovine, principal constituents of ergot, the grain deformity and toxic infectant of flour caused by the fungus of grasses, Claviceps purpurea). LSD is prepared in the laboratory by chemical synthesis. Its basic chemical structure is similar to that of the ergot alkaloids. LSD also is related structurally to several other drugs (e.g., bufotenine, psilocybine, harmine, and ibogaine); all can block the action of serotonin (the indole amine transmitter of nerve impulses) in brain tissue. LSD was discoverd 1938 by the Swiss chemist Albert Hoffman. LSD produces marked deviations from normal behaviour, which probably are consequences of its ability to inhibit the action of serotonin, though the mechanism of the drug remains uncertain. Because of that ability LSD was used experimentally in medicine as a psychotomimetic agent to induce mental states that were believed to resemble those of actual psychotic diseases (primarily the schizophrenias).

After administration, LSD can be absorbed readily from any mucosal surface, even from the ear, and acts within 30 to 60 minutes. Its effects usually last for 8 to 10 hours; occasionally some effects persist for several days. Two serious side effects are prolongation of and transient reappearance of the psychotic reaction.

Since LSD is not an approved drug, its therapeutic applications are regarded as experimental. In the 1960s LSD was proposed for use in the treatment of neuroses, especially for patients who were recalcitrant to more conventional psychotherapeutic procedures. LSD also was tried as a treatment for alcoholism and was used to reduce the suffering of terminally ill cancer patients. The drug also was studied as an adjunct in the treatment of narcotic addiction, of autistic children, and of the so-called psychopathic personality. None of these claims were substantiated by the early 1990s, and researchers found no clinical value in the use of LSD.

Pure LSD is a white, odorless crystalline pow der that is soluble in water. Because an effective dose of the pure drug is almost invisible, it is mixed with other substances, such as sugar, and packaged in capsules, tablets, or solutions, or spotted on to gelatin sheets or pieces of blotting paper.

LSD is usually taken orally, but is sometimes inhaled or injected. Short-term effects appear soon after a single dose and disappear within a few hours or days. Appearing first are physical effects including: numbness; muscle weakness and trembling; rapid reflexes; increased blood pressure, heart rate, and temperature; impaired motor skills and coordination; dilated pupils; nausea; and, occasionally, seizures. Dramatic changes in perception, thought, and mood occur shortly after the physical effects. These may include:

vivid, usually visual, "pseudohallucinations" that the user is aware are not real distorted perceptions of: time (minutes seem like hours); distance (hazardous if operating motor vehicles or standing near balcony edges); gravity (sensations of floating or being pressed down); the space between oneself and one's environment (for some, a feeling of oneness with the universe, for others, a feeling of terror)

fusion of the senses (music is "seen," colors "heard")

diminished control over thought processes, resulting in recent or long-forgotten memories resurfacing and blending with current experience, or in insignificant thoughts or objects taking on deep meaning feelings of a mystical, religious, or cosmic nature (generally the most desired effect).

But many users experience unpleasant reactions to LSD. Fear, anxiety, and depression may occur, even with experienced users who have had no prior adverse reactions. Calling these reactions "bad trips," users feel that they are losing their identity, disintegrating into nothingness, and that there is no reality. Pseudo-hallucinations give way to terrifying true hallucinations, sometimes resulting in violence, homicide, or suicide. In some cases, this psychotic state lasts several days or even longer. Because adverse effects are particularly common among new users, early LSD trips are usually taken in the company of experienced users who can often help curb acute panic reactions.

No deaths resulting exclusively from LSD overdose have been reported. Cases of suicide, however, have occurred during or following LSD intoxication. Other results of violent or hazardous behavior include accidental (some times bizarre) fatalities, homicides, and self-mutilations.

Long-term effects appear after repeated use over a lengthy period, or some time after the short-term effects of a single dose have worn off. "Flashbacks" (unpredictable, spontaneous recurrences of the original LSD experience without the user's taking the drug again) can occur weeks, months, or even up to a year after the last encounter with the drug. Typically, flashbacks last only a few minutes or less and are usually visual images ranging from formless colors to frightening hallucinations. The cause of the flashbacks is unknown, but they frequently occur after an LSD user smokes cannabis.

Chronic LSD use may result in prolonged depression and anxiety.

There appears to be a higher risk of spontaneous abortion and congenital abnormalities in babies born to women who regularly used LSD during pregnancy. But in almost all such cases reviewed, the mothers had also taken other drugs during pregnancy; it is thus difficult to determine how much each drug contributed to the problems. Tolerance to LSD's hallucinatory and physical effects develops rapidly, making larger amounts of the drug necessary to produce the same effects. Often, within a few days of consecutive daily doses, no amount of the drug will produce the desired effects. After several days of abstinence, however, both the hallucinatory effects and the effects on blood pressure and reflexes are again felt. A person who has built up tolerance to LSD will also be resistant to the effects of the other, less potent hallucinogens, such as psilocybine and mescaline. This phenomenon is called cross-tolerance.

There is no physical dependence on LSD after continuous use, for there are no withdrawal symptoms after the drug is discontinued. Some regular LSD users become psychologically dependent on the drug, and the need to keep taking it becomes a compulsion. They represent a small minority of LSD users, however, and in street language are called "acid heads" or "acid freaks". LSD 25 (+)-Lysergide. LSD downer Colloquial term for LSD user. LSD-Schlucker German colloquial term for LSD user.

Luasmin Drug containing more than one substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital sodium.

Lubage Colloquial term for marijuana.

Lubalix Chlordiazepoxide or Cloxazolam.

Luban-tree Boswellia sacra.

Lubelival E Drug containing more than one substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital.

Lubelival simple Drug containing more than one substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital sodium. Lubergal Phenobarbital. Lubigan Calamus. Lubrokal Phenobarbital. Lubän Boswellia sacra. Lucas Colloquial term for marijuana. Lucayan Tilidine hydrochloride. Lucky Charmz Colloquial term for ecstacy. Lucodan Hydromorphone. Luctor Clorazepate dipotassium. Lucy Colloquial term for LSD. Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds 1. Colloquial term for LSD. 2. Title of a song by the Beatles inspired of LSD. Lucy in the sky Colloquial term for LSD. Ludding out Colloquial term for taking methaqualone.

Ludes 1. Colloquial term for depressant. 2. Colloquial term for methaqualone. Ludies Colloquial term for designer drugs, amfetamine.

Luding out 1. Colloquial term for depressant. 2. Colloquial term for rapid intoxication through mixing methaqualone (Quaalude) with wine.

Ludlow, Fitz Hugh (1836-1870) US priest conducting drug experiment on himself. He was especially interested in the effects of cannabis and published the first modern book on cannabis in English The Hascheesh Eater 1857.

Ludonal Oxycodone hydrochloride. Luds 1. Colloquial term for depressant. 2. Colloquial term for methaqualone. Luftfracht German colloquial term for a large quantity of drugs which is smuggled by airplane.

Luftodil Drug containing more than one substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital.

Luftpost Colloquial term for a small amount of drugs.

Lufyllin-EPG Drug containing more than one substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital.

Luk-ra-bert Thai colloquial term for opium in the form of pills, in the size of grain or corn, taken with water.

Lull Drug containing more than one substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital sodium. Lum-sedo Phenobarbital sodium. Lumadyne Drug containing more than one substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital.

Lumb-bomb Thai colloquial term for opium in the form of pills, in the size of grain or corn, taken with water.

Lumber Colloquial term for a joint of marijuana.

Lumbo Colloquial term for marijuana. Lumcalcio Phenobarbital calcium. Lumen Phenobarbital. Lumergal Phenobarbital. Lumesettes Phenobarbital. Lumesyn Phenobarbital. Lumi Finnish colloquial term for cocaine. Lumidrops Phenobarbital. Lumiflor Drug containing more than one substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital sodium. Luminal Phenobarbital tablet formerly made by Winthrop Laboratories until patent expired - popular street substance. Luminal -e, -um Phenobarbital. Luminal sodium Phenobarbital sodium. Luminaletas Phenobarbital. Luminaletten Phenobarbital. Luminalum natrium Phenobarbital sodium.

Luminax Secobarbital.

Lumindon Phenobarbital.

Luminidral Phenobarbital.

Luminox Secobarbital.

Lumisedai Drug containing more than one substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital.

Lumitropil Phenobarbital.

Lumofridetten Phenobarbital.

Lump sugar Colloquial term for LSD on sugar cubes.

Lumpenpuppe German colloquial term for LSD on paper.

Lunch head Colloquial term for an alcoholic.

Lunch-hour-trip Colloquial term for DMT. Lunchbox Colloquial term for kids that do drugs

Lundell, Ulf (b.1949) Swedish rock musician, poet and author. His first book Jack (1976) became a generation-novel, strongly inspired of Jack Keroacs On the road. The main character is a middle class hero who drops out and enjoys sex and drugs and rock and roll. In a number of partly autobiographical books he has then described the problems of drug abuse and alcoholism. After several crises and abuse problems he made a strong come back in the 1990s. Lung-Li Seeds from the Southeast Asian herb Nepehlium topengii. The fruit is covered in a thorny capsule and is edible but the seeds are very toxic. Their hallucinogen properties was described in China 1175. Lunipax Flurazepam or Flurazepam hydro-chloride .

Lupatro Drug containing more than one substance under international control: Phenobarbital and Phenobarbital sodium. Lupatro T Drug containing more than one substance under international control: Phenobarbital.

Luphenil Phenobarbital.

Luramin Phenobarbital.

Luscher German colloquial term for a person who prefers alcohol to drugs.

Luserpal Drug containing more than one substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital.

Lush Colloquial term for prestige group on Skid Row; healthiest group, seldom indulging in non-beverage alcohol. Lusia Finnish colloquial term for serving a prison term.

Lusyn Drug containing more than one substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital. Lutawin Lorazepam. Luteonormon Amobarbital. Lutki Cannabis.

Lutschbonbon German colloquial term for tablets as substitutes.

Luukku Finish Colloquial term for a place where drugs can be purchased. Luvdup Colloquial term for the collective feelings of love and excitement after use of hallucinogen drugs at a rave-party. Luxidin Pipradrol hydrochloride. Luzepin Medazepam. Lyberen Meprobamate. Lycon Chlordiazepoxide or Chlordiazepox-ide hydrochloride.

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Responses

  • CHANEL
    What is lupatro used for?
    2 years ago

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