Babasol No 2 1 Barbital 2 Barbital sodium

Babayan, Edouard Armenakovich Member of UN:s International Narcotics Control Board, INCB. Graduate of the Second Moscow Medical Institute (1941). Professor, Doctor of Medical Science, Academician. Chairman of the Standing Committee on Narcotic Drugs Control of the Russian Federation (nongovernmental). Expert of the World Health Organization (WHO). Vice-President of the International Council on Alcohol and Addictions. Author of over 200 scientific papers, inter alia/, monographs and courses on drug control, published in many countries throughout the world.

Babe Colloquial term for drug used for detoxification.

Baby 1. Colloquial term for cannabis.

2. Colloquial term for a minor heroin habit.

3. German colloquial term for marijuana user.

4. Colloquial term for THC, in the street dealing often PCP or LSD. 5. Colloquial term for newcomer to Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, Al-Anon or Cocaine Anony mous.

Baby Face Colloquial for heroin . Baby Hawaiian wood rose Argyreia nervosa.

Baby T Colloquial term for crack. Baby bhang Colloquial term for marijuana. Baby habit Colloquial term for occasional use of drugs.

Baby is born Colloquial term amongst Skid Row alcoholics meaning that they have enough money to purchase a bottle of alcoholic beverage.

Baby sit Colloquial term for looking after another drug user, especially in connection with use of hallucinogens like LSD, during his trip, often done by an experienced friend. Babydroge German colloquial term for hashish by intravenous drug users. Babysit Colloquial term for guiding someone through his first drug experience. Babystrich German colloquial term for streets and places where young girls prostitute themselves in order to obtain drugs or money for drugs.

BAC Abbreviation for Blood Alcohol Concentration or Blood Alcohol Content. The concentration of alcohol in the blood is usually measured in milligrams (mg.) per cent. Bacarate Phendimetrazine bitartrate. Bacchae The priestesses and women followers of Bacchus.

Bacchanalia 1. In Roman religion a festival honoring Bacchus., the god of wine. Also called Dionysia. Originally a religious ceremony, it led to drunken, licentious excesses and was outlawed (186 B.C.).In Greco-Roman religion, any of a number of Bacchus (Dionysus) festivals. They originated as rites of fertility gods. The most famous of the Greek Dionysia were in Attica and included the little, or rustic, Dionysia, characterized by simple, old fashioned rites; the Lenaea, which included a festival procession and dramatic performances; the Anthesteria, essentially a drinking feast; the city, or great Dionysia, accompanied by dramatic performances in the theatre of Dionysus, which was the most famous of all; and the Oschophoria ("Carrying of the Grape Clusters").

Introduced into Rome from lower Italy, the Bacchanalia were at first held in secret, attended by women only, on three days of the year. Later, admission was extended to men, and celebrations took place as often as five times a month. The reputation of these festivals as orgies led in 186 BC to a decree of the Roman Senate that prohibited the Bacchanalia throughout Italy, except in certain special cases. Nevertheless, Bacchanalia long continued in the south of Italy. 2. A riotous, boisterous, or drunken festivity; a revel. Latin, from Bacchus, Bacchus, from Greek Bakkhos.

Bacchant 1. A priest or votary of Bacchus. 2. A boisterous reveler. Latin bacchans, bacchant-, present participle of bacchari, to celebrate the festival of Bacchus, from Bacchus, Bacchus, from Greek Bakkhos.

Bacchantes, the Film released in 1963. Original title: Le Baccanti. Director: Giorgio Ferroni. Taina Elg plays a ballerina named Dirce who, butterly fashion, flits from lover to lover. Her latest is a hedonist young man named Dionysius (Pierre Bice). Frivolity veers dangerously towards tragedy, as a "Greek Chorus" of older observers-foremost among these is Akim Tamiroff-look on in bemuse-ment and bewilderment. The basic story of The Bacchantes might seem familiar to first-year students in Greek drama. And well it should: the film is essentially an update of Euripides' The Bacchae. Bacchic 1. Of or relating to Bacchus. 2. Drunken and carousing; bacchanalian. Bacchnal 1. A participant in the Bacchanalia. 2. The Bacchanalia. 3. A drunken or riotous celebration in general. 4. A reveler. Bacchus Bacchus, in Greek and Roman mythology, the god of wine, identified with Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, and Liber, the Roman god of wine. The son of Zeus (Jupiter), Bacchus is usually characterized in two ways. One is that of the god of vegetation, specifically of the fruit of the trees, who is often represented on Attic vases with a drinking horn and vine branches. As he came to be the popular national Greek god of wine and cheer, wine miracles were reputedly performed at certain of his festivals. The second characterization of the god, that of a deity whose mysteries inspired ecstatic, orgiastic worship, is exemplified by the Maenads, or Bacchantes. This group of female devotees left their homes to roam the wilderness in ecstatic devotion to the god. They wore fawn skins and were believed to possess occult powers. The name Bacchus came into use in ancient Greece during the 5th century BC. It refers to the loud cries with which he was worshiped at the Bacchanalia, frenetic celebrations in his honor. These events, which supposedly originated in spring nature festivals, became occasions for licentiousness and intoxication, at which the celebrants danced, drank, and generally debauched themselves. The Bacchanalia became more and more extreme and were prohibited by the Roman Senate in 186 BC. In the first century AD, however, the Dionysiac mysteries were still popular, as evidenced by representations of them found on Greek sarcophagi.

Bacchus and the myths surrounding him have been an important subject in later cults and celebrations of alcohol and the holiness of the intoxication, especially in Europe in the 18th century.

BACCHUS Acronym for Boost Alcohol Consciousness Concerning the Health of University Students.

Baccy Colloquial term for tobacco. Bach Calamus.

Bacha 1. Colloquial term for a joint of marijuana. 2. Calamus.

Bachilla Colloquial term for a joint of marijuana.

Bachnag Persian name for Aconitum ferox. Bachnag Hindi name for Aconitum ferox. Back door Colloquial term for residue left in a pipe.

Back off Colloquial term for injecting drug partially into a vein and then withdrawing blood into syringe before reinjecting. Black tabs Colloquial term for LSD. Back to back Colloquial term for smoking crack after injecting heroin, or heroin used after smoking crack. Back up See Backup.

Backbreakers Colloquial term for LSD and strychnine.

Backbuck Colloquial term for neck of a bottle used for smoking hashish. Backdoor artist Colloquial term for drug misuser who specializes in cheating other drug misusers.

Backjack Colloquial term for injecting opium.

Backstrap Colloquial term for assure proper positioning of needle by drawing blood into syringe.

Backtrack Colloquial term for allow blood to flow back into the needle and syringe during injection of drugs to repeat and prolonge the kick feeling. The habit practiced by some intravenous drug users involves increased risks of spreading aids and hepatitis. Backup 1. Colloquial term for prepare vein for injection. 2. Colloquial term for permitting blood to back up into a syringe to ensure the needle is in a vein or to repeat and prolong the drug kick. This habit is a risk for spreading aids and hepatitis.

Backwards Colloquial term for tranquilizers.

Bacteiral infections Inflammations caused by bacteria, one-cell microorganisms is a common complication to substance abuse. Addicts have a remarkable low resistance against these infections, because of malnutri tion and because the liver often is overloaded with toxic substances and can not engage in the normal defense.

Local infections or inflammations in in the vascular walls (tromboflebit), inflammation often spread via lymphatic system and the lymphatic glands. It is often the intravenous misusers own staphylococci from his skin that are spread via the injections. A dermatologic complication is the the so called "drug roses" caused by bacteria spread via the circulation of the blood. They consists of plenty of blushes and are specially common among intravenous amfetamine misusers. They are caused by bacteria in the injected substance.

A dangerous complication after bacterial attacks are blood poisoning, sepsis. Bacteria in the circulation of the blood can also attack the cardiac valve (endocardit), the brain (brainab-cess) or the cerebral membranes (meningit). Syringe and needle exchange programs seems to reduce these risks considerably. Tuberculosis, caused by the tubercle bacillus has since the beginning of the 1990s had a rapid spread especially among HIV-positive drug misusers in the bigger cities in USA and Europe, in some cases it is multi-resistent tubercle bacillus.

Bad Colloquial term for crack. Bad Harry Colloquial term for.heroin. Bad Influence Colloquial term for heroin. Bad Joe Colloquial term for narcotics agent. Bad acid 1. Colloquial term for LSD. 2. Colloquial term for mescaline. Bad bundle Colloquial term for inferior quality heroin.

Bad cat Colloquial term for.person who cheats (in drug deals).

Bad go Colloquial term for bad reaction to a drug.

Bad head Colloquial term for being confused after drug use.

Bad mouth Colloquial term for making a negative statement about someone. Bad pizza Colloquial term for PCP. Bad scene Colloquial term for negative experience while being high on drugs. Bad scrip Colloquial term for forged prescription.

Bad scrip passer Colloquial term for person who steals and forges prescriptions. Bad script Colloquial term for forged prescription.

Bad seed 1. Colloquial term for peyote. 2. Colloquial term for heroin. 3. Colloquial term for marijuana.

Bad trip 1. Bad LSD experience with nightmare hallucinations. 2. Colloquial term for an adverse effect of drug use, consisting of any mixture of the following: feelings of losing control, distortions of body image, bizarre and frightening hallucinations, fears of insanity or death, despair, suicidal thoughts, and strong negative affect. Physical symptoms may include sweating, palpitations, nausea, and paraesthesias. Although adverse reactions of this type are usually associated with the use of hallucinogens, they may also be caused by the use of amfetamines and other psychomotor stimulants, anticholinergics, antihistamines, and sedatives/hypnotics. BADD Acronym for Bartenders Against Drunk Driving.

Badge Colloquial term for narcotics agent. Badoh Turbina corymbosa See: Olo-liugui.

Badoh blanco Turbina corymbosa. See: Ololiugui.

Badoh-negro Seeds from Ipomoea purpurea.

See: Morning glory seeds. Badoh-shnaash Turbina corymbosa. See: Ololiugui.

Badoor Turbina corymbosa. See: Ololiugui. Bador Aztek word for Morning glory seed. Baeyer, Adolf von (1835-1917). German chemist, synthesized 1864 barbituric acid, the first barbiturate drug, his work was eclipsed by that of his associate F. A. Kekule. He obtained 1892 the first synhtnesis of terpene. Baeyer discovered a new group of dyes-the phthaleins-demonstrated their chemical nature, and, with Heinrich Caro, developed these compounds into dyestuffs. For this research on dyes and his synthesis of indigo, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1905.

Bag 1. Colloquial term for a container for drugs, usually a small plastic bag 5 x 5 cm, standard amount for sale. 2. Colloquial term for a single dose of heroin, in small plastic bag.

Bag action Colloquial term for purchasing a packet of heroin.

Bag bride Colloquial term for a crack-smoking prostitute.

Bag carrier Colloquial term for person who transports luggage, especially internationally, which contains money or drugs or drug supplies.

Bag man Colloquial term for a person who transports money.

Bag one's interest Colloquial term for interest in drugs.

Baggie Colloquial term for plastic bag containing approximately 1 ounce (28 g) of marijuana.

Bagging 1. Colloquial term for using inhalants. 2. Colloquial term for inhalant sprayed in a bag for inhaling.

Baggy Colloquial term for a plastic bag containing approximately 1 ounce (28 g) of marijuana.

Bagman Colloquial term for a drug dealer, supplier, deliverer.

Bah and rang 1. Colloquial term for cannabis. 2. Colloquial term for drugs in general. Bah-say 1. Colloquial term for freebase cocaine. 2. Colloquial term for coca paste (basuco).

Bahn German colloquial term for a row of injection marks.

Bahnhof Zoo Railway and U-Bahn-station in the center of the Western part of Berlin and since the 1970s one of the main drug-scenes in Berlin. The name became known worldwide after being mentioned in the title of the book.Wir Kinder von Bahnhof Zoo. Bahsey Colloquial term for crack. Baikua Brugmansia suaveolens. Bail of hay Colloquial term for a quantity of dried marijuana leaves. Bailey, Hannah Clark Johnston (18391923), US. reformer who was a leading advocate of the peace movement in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In 1883 Bailey joined the Woman's Christian Temperance Union. From 1887 to 1916 she headed its International Department of Peace and Arbitration; she published two widely circulated monthly periodicals, the Pacific Banner and the Acorn.

Bailey traveled widely throughout the United States promoting pacifism, temperance, and woman suffrage.

Bajegida Canadian name for Calamus. Bajon Argentinean colloquial term for the depression or let down after drug effects wear off.

Bakana Scirpus, herb and hallucinogenic drug used by the tarahumara Indians in Mexico.

Bakanawa Cactus, Coryphanta compacta , even called hikuli and wichuri, used in Mexico in the same way as peyote. Bakanil a iits Piper auritum. Bakaridian Colloquial term for amfetamines. Bake-water Colloquial term for the equipment needed to manufacture crack. Bakepowder See: Baking soda. Bakfull Swedish colloquial term for suffering from a hang-over.

Bakfylla Swedish colloquial term for hangover.

Bakhog Swedish colloquial term for hangover after drug use.

Baking soda NaHCO3. A white crystalline compound, with a slightly alkaline taste, used in making effervescent salts and bever ages, artificial mineral water, pharmaceuticals, and fire extinguishers. Also called bicarbonate of soda, sodium bicarbonate. Baking soda is the main component added to cocaine when crack is made. Baking soda is also a common adulterating substance for illegal drugs. Bakpulver Baking soda. Bakpundig Swedish colloquial term for being detoxified. Bakramil Phenobarbital. Bakrus Swedish term for a hangover. Baksmalla Swedish colloquial term for a hangover.

BAL Acronym for: Blood Alcohol Level. Bala Colloquial term for Seconal. Balance Chlordiazepoxide. Balance-L Chlordiazepoxide. Balancel Chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride. Balbarbzyme Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital. Baldon Dimethylthiambutene. Baldrian-Dispert Valeriana. Baldronit Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Barbital.

Baldronit forte Drug containing more than one substance under international control: Barbital and Phenobarbital. Baldronit nitro Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Barbital. Bale Colloquial term for marijuana. Bale of hay Colloquial term for a large quantity of marijuana, about one pound (0.454 kg).

Balkan-route Transport route for drugs especially heroin and cannabis from cultivation areas in Asia to Europe. The political changes in Eastern Europe and the war in former Yugoslavia has made it very difficult for custom and police to control the flow of drugs through the Balkan route. Ball Colloquial term for crack. Ball room Colloquial term for a place where marijuana is smoked.

Balla ur Swedish colloquial term for losing control or being mentally impaired by drug use.

Balling Colloquial term for vaginally implanted cocaine.

Balloon 1. Balloons are used as packing material for drugs which are swallowed and smuggled through national borders for drug dealers or in order to prevent detection in prisons. Compare: Body-packer. 2. Instrument used to measure alcohol contents in exhaled air. A color marker turns red if the alcohol contents exceeds a certain limit. Used as a first check in police controls for detection of drunken drivers. When positive it in many countries has to be confirmed with another test, often a blood-sample, to be legally binding. 3. Colloquial term for heroin. 4. Colloquial term for heroin supplier. Balloon-effect Sociological term to describe how restrictions against one drug can effect the misuse of another drug. The metaphor used is when you squeeze a balloon at one place the air is transported to another place and the balloon is expanded there. For example when alcohol is prohibited other substances such as cannabis is to some extent substituting or when there are strict enforcement against cannabis the heroin use in some cases had shown an increase. The theory is controversial because a general liberal as well as a general restrictive attitude against substance misuse usually effects drug consumption in general

Balloon-gas Helium, common balloon-gas from children's balloons or from containers can be inhaled, the helium influences the vocal cords and makes the voice strange (called Donald Duck-voice). Inhaling of small amounts of helium is not dangerous. Inhaling massive amounts of helium can lead to lack of oxygen in the brain and risk for unconsciousness and death.

Ballot Colloquial term for heroin. Ballotyl Phenobarbital sodium. Balot Colloquial term for heroin. Balphenyl Phenobarbital sodium. Bam 1. Colloquial term for depressants. 2. Colloquial term for amfetamines. Bama Meprobamate.

Bamadex Drug containing more than one substance under international control: Dexam-fetamine sulfate and Meprobamate. Bamate Meprobamate. Bambalacha Colloquial term for marijuana. Bambalacha rambler Colloquial term for a marijuana smoker.

Bambi Colloquial term for heroin and metamfetamine hydrochoride (Desoxyn). Bambia Cannabis.

Bambinos Colloquial term for amfetamine pills.

Bambita Colloquial term for amfetamines. Bamboo Colloquial term for smoking opium. Bamboo, suck of Colloquial term for smoking opium.

Bambs Colloquial term for depressants. Bambu Colloquial term for a joint, cannabis cigarette.

Bambu case Colloquial term for receptacle for marijuana joints. Bametinas Meprobamate. Bami Meprobamate.

Bammies Colloquial term for marijuana of poor quality.

Bammy Colloquial term for marijuana. Bamo Colloquial term for barbiturates. Bamo 400 Meprobamate. Bams Colloquial term for marijuana of poor quality.

Bamyl Diazepam.

BAN British Approved Name, official non-proprietary name approved by the British Pharmacopoeia Commission. Ban apple gas Colloquial term for amyl nitrite.

Bana torampi Cacao. Banana Colloquial term for cannabis. Banana skin See. Mellow yellow. Bananadine See: Mellow yellow. Bananes French colloquial term for dried banana leaves which can be smoked. Banano Colloquial term for marijuana, or tobacco cigarette laced with cocaine. Banapple gas Colloquial term for amyl nitrite.

Banatil Secbutabarbital. Banbalacha Colloquial term for cannabis. Banbalancha Cannabis. Bancap Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Butalbital.

Bancaps C Drug containing more than one substance under international control: Codeine phosphate and Secbutabarbital sodium. Bancko Colloquial term for cannabis residue.

Band house Colloquial term for jail. Band, take a Colloquial term for using drugs.

Bandalon Colloquial term for cigarette paper used to roll a marijuana joint. Bandera Colloquial term for narcotics agent. Bandillero Mexican colloquial term for heroin user.

Bandit pills Colloquial term for barbiturates.

Bandje Colloquial term for cannabis. Bandsch Cannabis.

Bandzo Colloquial term for cannabis residue.

Banesin Forte Secbutabarbital sodium.

Banewort Belladonna.

Bang 1. Colloquial term for injecting a drug.

2. Colloquial term for inhaling a drug.

3. Colloquial term for hashish and marijuana.

4. Colloquial term for beverages containing cannabis. 5. Colloquial term for cannabis which is swallowed. 6. Colloquial term for marijuana of poor quality.

Bang in the arm Colloquial term for injection of drugs in the arm. Bang, -a Cannabis.

Banga Colloquial term for hashish and marijuana.

Bangal Colloquial term for cannabis. Bang Swedish colloquial term for being mad or confused, often due to drugs. Bangen Swedish colloquial term for the police.

Bangen tralar 1. Swedish colloquial term for police action. 2. Title of a popular song from the musical Speedy Gonzales (1974) of the group Nationalteatern from Gothenburg, Sweden.

Banghi Colloquial term for beverage containing cannabis. Banghi, -a Cannabis. Bangi Colloquial term for marijuana. Bangi-Aku Cannabis.

Bangi-aku Colloquial term for beverage containing cannabis.

Banging Colloquial term for being high on drugs.

Bango Portuguese colloquial term for hashish.

Bangrita Swedish colloquial term for Ritalin. Bangtjack Swedish colloquial term for hallucinogen drugs such as LSD and ecstasy. Bangster Colloquial term for intravenous drug user. Bangue Cannabis. Bangui Colloquial term for hashish. Banguin Colloquial term for hashish. Banisteria caapi Synonym for Baniste-riopsis caapi.

Banisteria quitensis Synonym for Baniste-riopsis caapi.

Banisterine Alkaloid from Banisteria caapi with hallucinogen properties. Banisteriopis inebrians Synonym for Banisteriopsis caapi. Banisteriopis quitensis Synonym for Ban-isteriopsis caapi.

Banisteriopsis caapi Lian in Amazons from its barque the hallucinogen drink yage is produced. The active substances are the alkaloids harmalin, harmine and d-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroharmin and banisterine. Banisteriosis caapi Lian in Amazons from its barque the hallucinogen drink yage is produced. The active substances are the alkaloids harmalin, harmine and d-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroharmin and banisterine. Banj Colloquial term for drugs in general. Bank bandit pills Colloquial term for depressants, especially barbiturates. Banker Colloquial term for drug financier who assumes little risk of arrest. Banulcos Phenobarbital. Baqual Secobarbital.

Bar 1. A counter at which drinks, especially alcoholic drinks, and sometimes food, are served. 2. An establishment or room having such a counter. 3. Colloquial term for marijuana.

Bär German colloquial term for LSD on paper.

Bar 8 Phenobarbital.

Bar elixir Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital.

Bar hopping Colloquial term for sequentially imbibing alcoholic beverages at several drinking places. Bar-100 Phenobarbital. Bar-15 Phenobarbital. Bar-25 Phenobarbital.

Bar-3 Drug containing more than one substance under international control: Amobarbi-tal sodium and Secobarbital sodium. Bar-30 Phenobarbital. Bar-4 Pentobarbital sodium. Bar-5 Secobarbital. Bar-Dex Dexamfetamine phosphate. Bar-cy-a-tab Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital. Bar-cy-amine Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital. Bar-don Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital.

Bar-drinker American term for person with a marked tendency to drink alcohol in bars. It can be because of religious or social rules against drinking in the home. The bar-drinking has a social function in the life of many persons. Intoxication in combination with social mingling after work can be a way to break loneliness and make new social contacts. AA has special groups for bar-drinkers to deal with their special problems. Bar-tropin Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital. Baranda Argentinean colloquial term for odor of marijuana smoke. Barang 1. Colloquial term for cannabis. 2. Colloquial term for drugs in general. Barang satay Colloquial term for cannabis in powder form.

Barb 1. Barbital. 2. Colloquial term for depressants.

Barb-5 Secobarbital sodium. BARB-6 Methylphenobarbital. Barb-drine Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital. Barbacine Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital. Barbaetyl Barbital.

Barbalixir Phenobarbital. Barballyl Allobarbital. Barbalphin Phenobarbital. Barbamid Amobarbital sodium. Barbamil Amobarbital. Barbamillum Amobarbital sodium. Barbamin Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Barbital. Barbamon Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Barbital. Barbamyl Amobarbital. Barbamyl, -um Amobarbital sodium. Barbapil Phenobarbital. Barbatose No. 2 Phenobarbital. Barbatrin Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital sodium. Barbatro No. 2 Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital. Barbe Colloquial term for barbiturates. Barbel-graduals Methylphenobarbital. Barbeldonna Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital. Barbella Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital. Barbellen Phenobarbital. Barbellin Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital.

Barbeloid 1. Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital. 2. Drug containing more than one substance under international control: Amobarbital and Pentobarbital sodium.

Barbeph Phenobarbital. Barbeph forte Phenobarbital. Barbevite Phenobarbital. Barbhexaclon, -e Phenobarbital propyl-hexedrine.

Barbicaine Phenobarbital. Barbico 1. Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital. 2. Drug containing more than one substance under international control: Barbital and Pentobarbital sodium.

Barbiculin Phenobarbital. Barbidal Allobarbital. Barbidein Pentobarbital. Barbidex Drug containing more than one substance under international control: Dexam-fetamine sulfate and Phenobarbital. Barbidonna Phenobarbital. Barbidonna No. 2 Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital. Barbies Colloquial term for depressant. Barbiflar Phenobarbital. Barbigan Pentobarbital. Barbihydan Phenobarbital. Barbihydan mite Drug containing more than one substance under international control: Phenobarbital. Barbikote Phenobarbital. Barbilettae Phenobarbital. Barbimetten Barbital sodium. Barbinal Phenobarbital. Barbinux Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Phenobarbital. Barbiphan Phenobarbital. Barbiphedrin Phenobarbital. Barbiphen Phenobarbital. Barbiphenal Methylphenobarbital. Barbipheneal Methylphenobarbital. Barbiphenyl Phenobarbital. Barbiphylline Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Methylphenobarbital or Phenobarbital.

Barbipil Phenobarbital. Barbipyrin Drug containing more than one active substance whereof one under international control: Barbital. Barbis Colloquial term for barbiturates. Barbisec Secobarbital sodium. Barbisodite Barbital sodium. Barbita Phenobarbital. Barbitab Secbutabarbital sodium. Barbital C8H12N2O3i Synthetic substance under international control according to the UN Convention on Psychotropic Substances, 1971, Schedule IV. Molecular weight: 184.2. Percentage of anhydrous base: 100. See: Barbiturates.

Barbital calcique French term for Barbital calcium.

Barbital calcium C16H22CaN4O6. Synthetic substance under international control according to the UN Convention on Psychotropic Substances, 1971, Schedule IV. Molecular weight: 406.4. Percentage of anhydrous base: 90.6. See: Barbiturates. Barbital calcico Spanish term for Barbital calcium.

Barbital magnesio Spanish for Barbital magnesium.

Barbital magnesium C16H22MgN4O6. Synthetic substance under international control according to the UN Convention on Psycho-tropic Substances, 1971, Schedule IV. Molecular weight: 390.7. Percentage of anhydrous base: 94.3. See: Barbiturates. Barbital magnésium French term for Bar bital magnesium.

Barbital sodique French term for Barbital sodium.

Barbital sodium C8H11N2NaO3. Synthetic substance under international control according to the UN Convention on Psychotropic Substances, 1971, Schedule IV. Molecular weight: 206.2. Percentage of anhydrous base: 89.3. See: Barbiturates. Barbital soluble Barbital sodium. Barbital sodico Spanish for Barbital sodium.

Barbital, -e, -io, -um Barbital. Barbitale sodico Barbital sodium. Barbitalum Natrium Barbital sodium. Barbitalum natricum Barbital. Barbitbitico Drug containing more than one substance under international control: Phenobarbital and Secobarbital. Barbiteina Phenobarbital sparteine. Barbiton, -e Barbital. Barbitone sodium Barbital sodium. Barbitonico Pentobarbital. Barbitos Portuguese colloquial term for barbiturates.

Barbitural Barbital. Barbituran Phenobarbital. Barbiturany Polish colloquial term for barbiturates.

Barbiturates One of a group of central nervous system depressants that chemically are substituted derivatives of barbituric acid; examples are amobarbital, pentobarbital, phenobarbital, and secobarbital. They are used as antiepileptics, anaesthetics, sedatives, hypnotics, and - less commonly - as anxio-lytics or anti-anxiety drugs. Acute and chronic use induces effects similar to those of alcohol. The barbiturates are derivatives of barbituric acid (malonyl urea), which is formed from malonic acid and urea. Barbital was first synthesized in 1903, and phenobarbital became available in 1912. The barbiturates act by depressing the central nervous system; they act particularly on certain portions of the brain, though they tend to depress the functioning of all the body's tissues. Most of them exert a sedative effect in small doses and a hypnotic effect in larger doses.

They are classified according to their duration of action. Long-acting barbiturates, such as barbital and phenobarbital, may last in their effects for as long as 24 hours and are used in conjunction with other drugs for the treatment of epilepsy, in which their prolonged depressant action helps prevent convulsions. Barbiturates of intermediate duration of action, such as amobarbital and butabarbital sodium, act for 6 to 12 hours and are used to relieve insomnia. Short-acting barbiturates, such as amobarbital and secobarbital, are used to overcome difficulty in falling asleep. Ul-trashort-acting barbiturates, such as thiopental sodium and thiamylal, are used intravenously to induce unconsciousness smoothly and rapidly in patients about to undergo surgery, after which gaseous anesthetics are used to maintain the unconscious state. Barbiturates have a narrow therapeutic-to-toxic dosage ratio and are often lethal in overdose. Because of their greater therapeutic ratio, the safer benzodiazepines have largely replaced barbiturates as sedatives/hypnotics or anxiolytics. Tolerance to barbiturates develops rapidly and the liability for harmful use or dependence is high. Patients who use these drugs over long periods can become psychologically and physically dependent. even though the prescribed dose is never exceeded. Barbiturates are associated with the full range of substances use disorders in cathegory F13 of ICD-10. Specific syptomatology includes the following: Barbiturate intoxication - impaired concentration, memory and coordination slurred speech, unsteady gait), lability of mood, garrulity, and loss of control over sexual or aggressive impulses. In overdose, intoxication may be fatal.

Withdrawal syndrome - following persistent use, rapid reduction or total cessation of barbiturates leads to a range of symptoms: nausea, vomiting, weakness, sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity (sweating, rapid pulse, elevated blood pressure), insomnia, coarse tremor of the hands or tongue. Grand mal convulsions occur in a high percentage of chronic barbiturate users after abrupt withdrawal Delirium usually appears within one week after cessation or significant reduction in dosage. Dementia - also termed barbiturate-induced residual psychotic disorder: persistent impairment of multiple higher cortical functions, including memory thought. orientation. comprehension, calculation, learning capacity, language, and judgment.

Besides having therapeutic uses, barbiturates are often used for their pleasurably intoxicating effects. Some people take them in addition to alcohol, or as a substitute. Heavy users of other drugs sometimes turn to them if their usual drugs are not available, or to counteract the effects of large doses of stimulants such as amfetamine or cocaine.

Barbiturates are known generally on the street as "downers" or "barbs." Many are named for the colors of their brand name versions - blues or blue heavens (Amytal), yellow jackets (Nembutal), red birds or red devils (Seconal). and rainbows or reds and blues (Tuinal). Barbituretas Phenobarbital.

Free Yourself from Panic Attacks

Free Yourself from Panic Attacks

With all the stresses and strains of modern living, panic attacks are become a common problem for many people. Panic attacks occur when the pressure we are living under starts to creep up and overwhelm us. Often it's a result of running on the treadmill of life and forgetting to watch the signs and symptoms of the effects of excessive stress on our bodies. Thankfully panic attacks are very treatable. Often it is just a matter of learning to recognize the symptoms and learn simple but effective techniques that help you release yourself from the crippling effects a panic attack can bring.

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